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, that collectively it is about who we choose to represent us. it is about the words they speak and the message they bring and what it is that they reflect and emulate, and that those people, when we cannot necessarily rely on what our spirit says, can help us identify and understand what is resonating in us, even when it is uncomfortable. i have been lucky. since the very beginning of my career, from the moment i work with michael jackson until now, i have had the same manager who has always been on a course of enlightenment and consciousness and has been a great source of strength, and he has run at me with people i can count on. tavis: you mentioned obama, and i will get back to michael jackson. >> i just wanted to make sure that use all the hair. tavis: we will bring that back. hold up that photo? i want to see that again. i have to ask about obama. you got political during the campaign this last time around. has that been a journey for you? >> i have always been political. when i was a kid, when i got to vote for the first time, my mother was a democrat and a father was republican. secretl
're already important for us. because many conflicts are around us. so therefore our attempt, our word and our insistence to contribute to the solution of the problems is appreciated. >> couric: and the prime minister of the palestinian authority, salam fayyad. >> it's one that's based definitely on dealing violence out of the equation for sure. that's our interest. that's how we defined it. from our point of view. it happens to be consistent with obligations that we took on the road map and going back to 1993. it's in our best interest, we're not doing no one else a favor but ourselves when we subscribe to nonviolence. as a really key component to what we have to do to get to freedom. >> couric: a program note: our interview with the c.e.o. of google, eric schmidt, will be seen at a later date. tonight, the president of turkey and the prime minister of the palestinian authority when we continue. captioning sponsored by rose communications from our studios in new york city, this is charlie rose. >> rose: abdullah gul is here, he's the president of turkey, a key u.s. ally and nato member, turke
is not very solid. it's about $30 sml a years which which is peanuts compared to what the u.s. has with china, with the european union. but the potential is huge. >> rose: and we conclude with one of the most interesting entrepreneurs in all of china, he is jack ma. his company is alled alibaba. >> core competence of our companies, we have 20,000, grow from 18 people, now 20,000 people. and we focus a lot on the making sure the culture, everybody works for helping others instead of just making money. and we believe different from wall street, we believe customer number one, employee two, shareholder three. >> rose: customer one, employee, two, shareholder three? >> yes, again, this is my religion. >> rose: russia and the world, china and technology when we continue. captioning sponsored by rose communications from our studios in new york city, this is charlie rose. >> rose: president obama came to office promising to reset relations with russia. he and russian president dmitry medvedev appeared to form a personal bond. they have since signed a nuclear arms reduction treaty-- now waiting to be
and reward system involves several different brain regions that communicate using chemical signals called neurotransmitters. the this circuit helps us to repeat the behaviors that make us happy while avoiding those that make us miserable. but as any adult knows, pleasure is not always good for you. tonight we'll also explore particularly dangerous forms of pleasure-seeking, addiction. long considered to be a moral weakness, addiction is now understood to be a biological disease. finally, we will explore the role that emotions play in decision-making and social interaction. next month, in part two of the emotional brain, we will turn our focus to negative emotions such as fear and anxiety. joining us tonight, a group of scientists who have devoted their lives to understanding the emotional brain. daniel salzman, he studies how the brain assigns an emotional value to the information that it receives from the five senses. he is an assistant professor of sky tri and neuroscience at columbia university. wolfram schultz. he studies how the brain's reward systems affect decision-making and learn
sponsored by wpbt >> tom: good evening and thanks for joining us. one word describes the mood of american businesses these days-- "uncertainty." susie, many companies are flush with cash, but they're not spending it or using it to hire workers because they're uncertain about the outlook on a host of important issues. >> susie: whether it's taxes, tom, new regulations, or health care reform, executives are not sure how these policies will impact their businesses. many economists say that uncertainty is a significant obstacle to economic recovery. >> tom: lawmakers return next week to washington, and republicans are expected to reopen debate on parts of healthcare reform. as stephanie dhue reports that'll add even more uncertainty to the business environment. >> as the november election draws near, senate republicans are sharpening their differences with democrats on health care. senator mike johanns says new requirements for small business tax filing have to go. he's making a case for that on youtube. >> this will mean a mountain of new paperwork for as many as 40 million businesses and ot
in florida with democratic candidate kendrick meek0 also with us is a musical legend dr. john from new orleans. he is the most visible ambassador for his town. along with his band, he is out with a new cd. join us tonight for kendrick meek and dr. john. >> all leno is his name is james and he needs extra help with his reading. >> james? >> yes. >> everyone making a difference. you help us live better. >> nationwide supports tavis in working to improve financial literacy and removing obstacles to financial empowerment one conversation at time. >> and by contributions to your pbs station by viewers like you. thank you. [captioning made possible by kcet public television] tavis: perhaps nowhere is there more attention paid in the senate race in florida. kendrick meek is the four term congressman who recently won the nomination for the senate seat. he joins us from miami. first of all, congratulations. it is an honor to have you on the program. >> thank you. i am honored to be here. tavis: usually it is the big election where you have to come out with the big guns blazing. it must feel lik
help us all live better. >> nationwide insurance supports tavis smiley. with every question and answer, nationwide insurance is happy to help tavis improve financial literacy and remove obstacles to economic empowerment one conversation at a time. nationwide is on your side. >> and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. [captioning made possible by kcet public television] tavis: always a pleasure to have ken burns on this program. he has once again turn his attention to america's pastime for a new documentary called " baseball: at the 10th inning," airing on most pbs stations on september 28. here is a scene from that documentary. >> far base ball players have succumbed to societal pressures to improve themselves, they are no worse than we are. >> people get upset. who in the whole country would not take a pill to take more money at your job? you would. if i said there was a pill in you'd get paid like steven spielberg, you would take the pill. tavis: ken burns joins us from charlotte, north carolina. is that chris rock peace convincing? >> no, it is fun
is important and facebook is a consequence and very impressive company. and social information will be used by google and by others, i should add, to make the quality of the results, the quality of the experience that much better. the pore we foe about what your friends do with your permission, and i need to say that about 500 times, we can actually use that to improve the experience you have of getting information that you care about. in our case what we're actually do something building social information into all of our products. so it won't be a social network the way people think of facebook but rather social information about who your friends are, people that you interact with. and we have various ways in which we will be collecting that information. >> we continue with the film wall street money never sleeps with the director all i ver stone and two of the jars, josh brolin and shia labeouf. >> the 2 o 008 market is more difficult to understand with credit default swaps and insurance and all that stuff. but we made it a background. that's the way we treated it. we treated the crisis,
mercedes benz lives by to this day. the best, or nothing. that is what drives us. >> additional funding provided by these funders. >> and by bloomberg. a provider of multimedia news and information services worldwide. ♪ ♪ >> charlie: sebastian pinera was elected president of chile in january with a mandate to create jobs and bolster the economy. he is chile's third richest citizen. 13 days before he took office, his country suffered one of the most devastating earthquakes in earthquake in the known history of mankind, and it s devastating. it was 10 days before we took office, and it really cost us first of all more than 500 lives. there are a lot of people missing still now. in terms of destruction, it was devastating. we lost one-third of our schools. so 1.35 million students couldn't go back to school because their schools were destroyed. one-third of our hospitals. we lost almost 200,000 homes. 1,000 miles of roads, bridges, airports, ports -- it was really devastating, but i am proud the way we have faced it because the chilean people are reconstructing the country and we are d
, a former baghdad chief for "the new york times." also with us tonight, laura lippman, with her new novel "i'd know you anywhere." john burns and author laura lippman. >> all i know is his name is james, and he needs extra help with his reading. >> i am james. >> yes. >> to everyone making a difference, you help us all live better. >> nationwide insurance supports tavis smiley. with every question and every answer, nationwide insurance is proud to join tavis smiley in working to improve financial literacy and remove obstacles to economic empowerment, one conversation at a time. nationwide is on your side. >> and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. [captioning made possible by kcet public television] >> ending this war is not in the interest of iraq. it is in our own. the united states has paid a huge price to put the future of iraq in the hands of its people. we have said our young men and women to make enormous sacrifices in iraq -- we have sent them. we have persevered because of a belief we share with the iraqi people, a belief that out of war, a new beg
are joining us. and we are remembering jefferson thomas, all coming up. et >> all i know is his name is james, and he needs extra help with his reading. >> i am james. >> yes. >> to everyone making a difference, you help us all live better. >> nationwide insurance supports tavis smiley. with every question and every answer, nationwide insurance is proud to join tavis in working to improve financial literacy and remove obstacles to economic empowerment, one conversation at a time. nationwide is on your side. >> and by ntributions to your s iewers like you. thank you. [captioning made possible by kcet public television] tavis: john boyd, jr. is president of the national black farmers' association. he held a press conference to highlight the failure of the congress to approve a settlement. he joins us tonight from new york. good to have you. >> good to be here, and i want to thank you for being involved with the black farmers and continuing to raise the issue. tavis: it is my pleasure, and i wanted to have you on tonight because after years of dealing with this, all that needs to happen is for c
joined us. a conversation with philip seymour hoffman. >> i am james. >> yes. >> to everyone making a difference, you help us all live better. >> nationwide insurance proudly supports tavis smiley. tavis and nationwide insurance, working to improve financial literacy and the economic empowerment that comes with it. your side ♪ >> and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. [captioning made possible by kcet public television] >> for more information on today's show, visit tavis smiley at pbs.org tavis: always pleased to welcome philip seymour hoffman to this program. he has established himself as one of the best of his generation. his latest project is called "jack goes bowling." also directs and produces it. here now is a scene from the movie. >> [inaudible] >> i am almost getting there. >> may be a little good night kiss? >> maybe. >> nothing overwhelming. >> ok. >> good night. it is your directorial debut of a film. we have a monitor in the studio. i saw you look at it. you looked away. what do you think of your work? >> it is funny. i have been wa
tasks smoothly and easily. it allows us to move and to speak and to interact with our surroundings, requiring only minimal amount of effort. but when the brain is damaged, its true complex sit revealed. our subject this evening is the neurological disorders. these include parkinson's disease. stroke. huntington's disease and spinal chord injury. these conditions have taught us more about our brain than any other kind of brain disease. through parkinson's we have learned about movement. through stroke we have learned about speech. and through spinal cord injuries we have learned how thoughts give rise to actions. neurological diseases have been a topic of research for sent yees but-- century bus only recently have we developed effective treatments. this evening we will meet a group of scientists who have developed ways to repair or bypass the disordered brain. john done o hew. his work allowed paralyzed patients to move and communicate using only their thoughts and a machine called a brain computer interface. he is a professor at brown university and co-founder of a company called c
memoir. we are glad to have joined us. join us for a ethan bronner air and james l. roy, coming up. >> all i know is his name is james, and he needs extra help with his reading. >> i am james. >> yes. >> to everyone making a difference, you help us all live better. >> nationwide insurance proudly supports tavis smiley. tavis and nationwide insurance, working to improve financial literacy and the economic empowerment that comes with it. >> ♪ nationwide is on your side ♪ >> and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. [captioning made possible by kcet public television] tavis: u.s. special envoy george mitchell is on an emergency mission to rescue the latest efforts for peace in the region. i am joined from jerusalem by ethan bronner. thanks for your time, a bit too heavy on the program tonight, sir pitt >> is a pleasure to be here. tavis: let me start with the obvious, the thing that has raised this level of concern so high tonight on the scale. israel, on sunday, allowed the moratorium on jewish settlements being built in the west bank, that allow
and doesn't help the u.s. economic recovery. but geithner said he was not prepared to label china a "currency manipulator" under u.s. law. >> tom: that reluctance was all too familiar to members of congress, and they grilled geithner with hostile questions. darren gersh reports. >> reporter: even the senators grilling the treasury secretary today admit hearings on china's overvalued currency have become something of a ritual over the years. it begins with the expression of outrage from senators like new york's charles schumer. >> at a time when the u.s. economy is trying to pick itself up off the ground, china's currency manipulation is like a boot to the throat of our recovery. and this administration refuses to try to take that boot off our neck. >> reporter: then, it's the treasury secretary's turn to share concern, to offer tougher rhetoric, and then to explain that declaring china a currency manipulator under the current law will do little more than require more consultations, as treasury secretary geithner explained today. >> wishing something does not make it so, and issuin
. and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. >> lehrer: the u.s. moved into what is planned as its final military phase in iraq today after ending its combat role. newshour correspondent kwame holman begins our coverage. >> reporter: cleaning up and packing-- that's what u.s. soldiers were doing on bases across iraq today. humvees rolled on to flatbed trucks and rows of equipment awaited transport home. last night, president obama marked the formal end of combat operations in iraq with a speech from the oval office. >> our combat mission is ending, but our commitment to iraq's future is not. this new approach reflects our long-term partnership with iraq , one based upon mutual interest and mutual respect. >> reporter: today, american military leaders marked the occasion with a change in command of the remaining 50,000 troops in iraq. vice president biden and defense secretary gates were among those presiding at the main u.s. military headquarters on the outskirts of baghdad. >> i pray that all those scarred by this war in iraq come to know the bond of lasting peac
. >> reporter: vincent reinhart used to help the fed meet its dual mandate as a senior policy adviser. with unemployment at close to 10%, he says it's clear the economy isn't operating anywhere close to maximum employment, which is closer to 5%. and what about price stability? indicators of core inflation are under 1%, with many prices flat or falling. but that isn't the same as price stability. >> it's possible to have too much of a good thing. >> reporter: why? because periods of high unemployment tend to push prices down and prices are not stable when they are rising or falling too much. >> as inflation starts falling and maybe even veering into deflation, the real value of what you have to pay back goes up and up and up. so it's harder for people who borrow, including the u.s. government, in that regard. >> reporter: with the fed failing to meet either of its mandates, economist josh bivens says the conclusion is clear. >> you're missing both mandates, but in the same direction for once. we're not acting aggressively enough to drive down unemployment, and we're not even acting agg
we do for you? >> and now "bbc world news." >> in the past couple of decades, internet use has spread across the planet, invading every aspect of life. in countries like south korea, going online seems to have become a necessity. >> [speaking korean] >> usually, i go online as soon as i wake up. on average, i use the internet for about 6 hours a day. >> in a unique experiment, the bbc has removed internet access from 2 families for a week, in this the most wired nation on earth. >> in other parts of the world, the digital superhighway still hasn't reached its destination. how many people here actually know what the internet is? [indistinct chattering] >> internet? anybody? now, though, we're going to be providing internet access to this village in northern nigeria. so, what happens when we turn the internet on here? >> and off here? [indistinct chattering] >> it's not exactly the information superhighway. [bleating] welcome to the village of gitata, 2 1/2 hours north of the nigerian capital abuja. what strikes you as you arrive in gitata is the fact that it seems so disconnected from
to close their markets. >> susie: that's u.s. trade rep ron kirk. he joins us for an exclusive interview about our trade issues with china. you're watching "nightly business report" for thursday, september 23. this is "nightly business report" with susie gharib and tom hudson. "nightly business report" is made possible by: this program is made possible by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. captioning sponsored by wpbt >> tom: good evening and thanks for joining us. president obama today met with china's premier in new york city, and, susie the leaders of the world's two biggest economies pledged to work together on boosting the global recovery. >> susie: but tom, in their public remarks, the men didn't talk about china's undervalued currency. instead, that's said to have topped the agenda for their private meeting. the issue-- keeping china's currency artificially low puts american exports at a disadvantage overseas. >> tom: lawmakers in washington, meantime, are closer than ever to acting on threats to penalize china over its currency. earlier today, i c
. and it may have been the lowest of the four elections held since u.s. forces ousted the taliban in 2001. there were also allegations of rampant fraud. >> we have seen ballot stuffing, proxy vote, underage voting, and also multiple voting. the most serious one is the ballot stuffing. our observers have observed in more than-- in around 280 centers in 28 provinces where the ballot stuffing did occur. >> reporter: afghanistan's leading election observation group called today for an independent investigation. also today president karzai spokesmen agreed that the fraud allegations warranted a second look. >> like any other election anywhere in the world this there are complaints there have been irregularities. but we are waiting for the respective organizations to investigate these complaints. and they should be the source of information to the afghan people about the existence of irregularities or fraud. >> reporter: at the same time, the afghan electoral commission criticized observer groups for being too quick to imply the election was tainted. still former foreign minister abdullah abdul
>> rose: welcome to our program. tonight, stephanie d'alessandro and john elderfield take us on a tour of a new matisse exhibit at the museum of modern art. >> it's a period when matisse really seemed to have very intently stopped the kind of work he was doing before and began searching for something and we can chart him through the evolution of "bathers by a river" in fact and then i think through "the exhibition" trying different modes of painting. bringing together different styles, avant-garde styles of the time, ways of making the surface of works very different and reworked. and we watch him not sure where he's going but excited about the possibility of a new kind of art for himself and we feel that for matisse that was a kind of radical invention. he said about "bathers by a river" and "moroccans" that they were two of the most pivotal works of his career. i think it's important he used the word "pivotal" and not "important." it suggests there was a change that those works brought about in his career and i think that's part of what that radical invention is about. >> i
in disguise because it has forced us to double of rate of our productivity and have no doubt that inherent in our spirit the more enemies we have, the more united and hard we work. >> rose: mahmoud ahmadinejad for the hour. next. >> rose: mahmoud ahmadinejad, the president of iran, is back in new york city. the rituals of his yearly visit are now familiar. he speaks to members of the press, he holds breakfast meetings and a lot of other meetings at the united nations. he address it is u.n. general assembly. his strip often accompanied by developing events. this year was the release of american hiker sarah shourd while two other hikers-- shane bauer and joshua fatale-- remain in an iranian jail accused of espionage. iran has been sanctioned four times by the security council for its failure to comply with the u.n. nuclear investigative agency the i.a.e.a. the obama administration, europe japan and even some arab nations have followed with some additional sanctions. some are very clear that a military strike should remain on the table if the sanctions does not work. one of those is former pr
and in congress is if you propose something that's bold, that touches these third rails, the other side will use it as a political weapon against you so don't dare try. we have to get off, if we court start tackling the fiscal problem, it will tack ale lot. what i do the point i'm trying to make is we do this now and get our prosperity agenda. what i mean when i say this is my plan says nothing changes for anybody 35 and above. -- 55 and above, so if you are 10 years away from retiring we can guarantee your benefit, if you are 54 and below you know the programs won't be the samement you know that the social insurance safety net system we have is imploding. we need to reform it to fix it. i use a few values and principals on how i fix those things am i go kif-- i can give you details if you like. the point i make is do it now, preema debt crisis, if he kick the can down the road it will be austerity to everybody. tax increases to current workers that is the pain plan we should avoid that. >> rose: i meant by dismantle, just dismantle in the traditional way that it works. in other words, you can u
, and thanks for joining us. too little too late. susie, that's the initial reaction from some business leaders to president obama's latest proposal to give tax breaks for businesses. >> susie: tom, the president will detail the plan tomorrow in cleveland. he's proposing that companies write off 100% of their investments in plants and equipment through next year. >> tom: the administration estimates the plan would cut business taxes by about $200 billion over the next two years. for some businesses, this "expensing" proposal could amount to a half-off sale on new equipment. darren gersh reports. >> reporter: you've probably heard about all those businesses sitting on their money, waiting for things to get better. the president's expensing plan could give executives an incentive to make a big purchase, says small business advocate todd mccracken. >> and what that does is it uses up a lot of extra cash that especially a lot of big companies seem to have right now bur that they're not using, they're not investing. and that has the potential to create jobs. >> reporter: but business groups are luke
in europe and the possible threat in the u.s. >> brown: margaret warner examines china's growing economic and military assertiveness in asia and globally. >> they're breaking diplomatic egg which is three or four years ago they would not have broken. so i think the change is palpable. >> woodruff: we talk to former clinton administration secretary of labor robert reich-- the last in our series of conversations on extending the bush-era tax breaks. >> brown: and jonathan miller of "independent television news" reports from northwest pakistan, where relief-aid is still slow in coming two months after the floods began. >> this is one of the worst affected areas in pakistan, but these people industrial no safe water, no food, no shelter, no medicine. something has gone very wrong. >> woodruff: that's all ahead on tonight's "newshour." major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: >> i want to know what the universe... >> looks like. >> feels like. >> from deep space. >> to a microbe. >> i can contribute to the world by pursuing my passion for science. >> it really is the key to the
sergeant olaf schmidt. >> almost a third happened here. in sangin. we join british and u.s. marines as they prepared for one of their last joint patrols. for a final few days, they must brave their demons and reflect on the sacrifices that have been made. commanders were keen to show was they've achieved, how the area has proffered prospered, how much safer it's become. but this is what we saw. a long and brutal fight throughout much of the day. it doesn't happen all the time anymore, but it shows the taliban still battling coalition troops. and now america must try to finish the job britain started. no british troops were injured this time but they faced too many days like this. >> i find it very difficult to talk about actually having someone have been there, you can't describe the smells, the sights, there's no way to describe all this, even pictures don't seem to work. you have to actually be there and go through the emotions to have a true understanding of what the people here go,000. >> handing over to the americans is a bittersweet moment for the troops. they're happy to be g
of the atmosphere every year. bnsf, theen engine that connects us. >> chevron. this is the power of human energy. >> intel. sponsors of tomorrow. >> and by the alfred p. sloan foundation, supporting science, technology and improved economic performance and financial literacy in the 21st century. and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. >> brown: president obama spent this labor day in the midwest to rally with union members and unveil a new plan to promote job growth. but even as he sharpend his focus on the economy, his political opponents sharpened their responses. >> around the nation this holiday, parades, barbecues and a continuing unease over the dismal jobs market. coming just after friday's report showing unemployment had edgeded up again to 9.6%, this was a labor day in which the state of the american work force was very much front and center. with that in mind and with a mid-term election just two months off
parliamentary elections. some of the political players may decide to use violence themselves as a pressure point. >> lehrer: newshour correspondent spencer michels examines the impact of u.s. supreme court rulings on local gun regulations in california. >> among the first results of the supreme court decisions on guns: gun shows like this may become more common in california. >> woodruff: plus an encore look at jeffrey brown's profile of tap dance great maurice hines passing the torch and tradition to a new generation. >> lehrer: that's all ahead on tonight's newshour. major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and... this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. >> lehrer: the east coast kept a weather eye on the sea today, waiting for the arrival of hurricane earl. the storm weakened some during the day, but still had winds of 115 miles an hour. in kill devil hills, north carolina, the day dawned on a relativel
. >> you help us all live better. >> nationwide insurance supports tavis smiley. with every question and every answer, nationwide insurance is proud to join tavis in working to improve financial literacy and remove obstacles to economic empowerment, one conversation at a time. nationwide is on your side. >> and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. [captioning made possible by kcet public television] tavis: a few programming notes. tomorrow night, a conversation with geoffrey canada and david guggenheim. then later in the week, james ellroy, and robert reich would join us with seal. we also will have nancy brinker. tonight, we kick off the week with harold for junior. the former tennessee congressman is now the chairman of the democratic leadership council, dlc, and and he has a new book, "more davids than goliaths." >> everyone should see that. what guggenheim and canada have done, it is inspiring. i hope people see it. >> it is a moving film. one thing i am sure that geoffrey and davis and i i am sure will talk about is that it is anti-union. what d
>> susie: good evening everyone, tom hudson is on assignment. jeff yastine joins us. the federal reserve kept its key interest rate at zero, but said it's ready to take action to boost the economy when the time is right. that announcement came today as the fed wrapped up its policy meeting in washington. susie, one thing that stood out at this meeting is the fed is getting more worried about inflation. the problem is, inflation is too low, and below what the fed considers acceptable. >> susie: that could be the catalyst for the fed to pump more money into the economy. so what will the central bank do next? suzanne pratt reports. >> reporter: two more meetings. one two-day event in early november, the other in mid december. that's the window the fed has left this year to boost the economy. but, whether the central bank eases monetary policy in the next few months depends on what happens with the economy. and, fed watcher dana saporta says it's clear now that policymakers have linked their next move to inflation, or more specifically, the lack of it. >> i think the fed is loath to use the
of the atmosphere every year. bnsf, the engine that connects us. >> and by the bill and melinda gates foundation. dedicated to the idea that all people deserve the chance to live a healthy productive life. and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and... this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. >> ifill: the health care reform law reached a kind of anniversary today, six months since president obama signed it into law, big new changes are set to take effect. health correspondent betty ann bowser has the story. >> hey, everybody. hello, hello! good to see you guys! >> reporter: the president marked the occasion in a northern virginia neighborhood today. his goal: to sell the six-month- old law to voters, six weeks before the mid-term elections. >> and so what we realized was we had to take some steps to start dealing with these underlying, chronic problems that have confronted our economy for a very long time. and health care was one of those issues that we could
double its u.s. workforce this holiday season, adding 45,000 temporary workers. the toy seller has already announced plans for 600 temporary toys 'r us express shops. the associated press is reporting the f.b.i. and the labor department are investigating the former head of the service employees international union for possible corruption. at issue: andy stern's approval of a california union leader's salary. stern resigned from the union abruptly in april. >> tom: still ahead, tonight's word on the street is "frontier." find out why that could be the place for global investors with an appetite for risk. >> susie: $1,300 and then some-- that's where gold prices closed today. gold rallied for the fifth straight day to a new high of $1,308. the precious metal is up 32% in the past year as investors seek safety. long-time metals traders like m.f. global's kevin grady think the buying binge will continue. >> well, i think we definitely hit $1,400 by christmas and possibly $1,500. i think, you know, what you need to look at is, who is going to step up and sell it? the bottom line is that
joined us. a conversation with tim robbins is coming up right now. >> all i know is his name is james, and he needs extra help with his reading. >> i am james. >> yes. >> to everyone making a difference, you help us all live better. >> nationwide insurance proudly supports tavis smiley. tavis and nationwide insurance, working to improve financial literacy and the economic empowerment that comes with it. >> ♪ nationwide is on your side ♪ >> and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. [captioning made possible by kcet public television] tavis: please welcome tim robbins back to this program. the actor and director also serves as writer for a play called "break the whip" about jamestown. here is now a scene from "break the whip." [drums beating] ♪ tavis: when you called me and asked me to come down to rehearsal to check this out. -- to check this out, i had no idea what i was going to see. imagine a piece about jamestown that does not mention pocahontas or -- >> or john smith. tavis: i was talking to our producer. i was curious how many times you have
james. >> yes. >> to everyone making a difference, you help us all a better. >> nationwide insurance supports tavis smiley. nationwide insurance is on your side. >> and by contributions from their pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. tavis: geoffrey canada is the ceo of the harlem tilden's zone. he is at the center of a wonderful new project from davis guggenheim called "waiting for superman." the film is a look at the state of public education in this country. >> one of the saddest days of my life was when my mother told me superman did not exist. i was a comic book readers. i read comic books. i love them. even in the death of the ghetto, you just thought -- in the depths of again, you just thought he would show up and he saves all the good people. maybe i was in the fourth grade. my mom said, superman is not real. what do you mean he is not? no, he is not real. she thought i was crying because i thought santa claus was not real. i cried because no one was coming with enough power to save us. kids look at the world and the make certain predictions based on the evidence the
writes the autobiography of our species. >> rose: right. >> so we are used to the story and we tell the story about the way we live. we train kid dpos to go to college. we train them in reasoning skills am we give them technical skills we have a series of strategies that people learn when they go into management. how to network, how to make decisions. and that is the story of human life told from the conscious level. but the revolution of consciousness tells us that below that level there's a more important and more fundamental level and more powerful and in some ways smarter level. and so my book is a description of life and the lives of two people told from that, of that underlevel. >> rose: the lives of two people. >> yeah, i make up characters. i have fictional characters just so exempt few. >> rose: but tell us about what you have found out about the unconscious mind. >> a couple things are important. the first is that we're shaped in so many ways by these unconscious decisions. in trivial ways, i mention by a study by a guy in buffalo that people named dennis are disproportion
be a sign that god would want us to do it, that the american people do not want the mosque there and, of course, muslims do not want us to burn the koran . the imam has agreed to move the mosque. we have agreed to cancel our event on saturday. >> suarez: the pressure on pastor jones from around the world had been increasing on him throughout the day. just this morning, president obama added his voice to those of international leaders asking jones to call it off saying it would be a "recruitment bonanza for al qaeda." >> as commander-in-chief of the armed forces of the united states, i just want him to understand that this stunt that he is talking about pulling could greatly endanger our young men and women in uniform who are in iraq, who are in afghanistan. >> reporter: in response to fears of retaliation, the state department issued a travel warning today for citizens abroad. it also ordered u.s. embassies around the world to ramp up their security in preparation. in pakistan and afghanistan today protestors burned u.s. flags and shouted anti-american slogans in anticipation of the
to get their agenda through. they said don't run away from us yet. we're eight weeks away from election day. you see a lot of democrats in very tough districts really starting to put distance between themselves and the national democrats, president obama, speaker pelosi. >> lehrer: you also believe looking further at those polls about dissatisfaction with government. there's stuff in there that needs to be noted as well, correct some. >> awe-i have looked all year long. it's this volatility, almost anger that exists inside the electorate. take a look at these numbers because this is fascinating when you look at it through history. today 78% of respondents say tler dissatisfied or angry with government and how government works versus 22% who are satisfied or enthusiastic. compare that, jim, to november 1994. you remember bill clinton was president. newt gingrich, the republican revolution and the takeover of the house of representatives, you are seeing more dissatisfaction and anger in the electorate now than you did when republicans won 54 seats and took over the house. >> lehrer: now t
collapsed under its own way. it would have been used by thousands of pedestrians as they walked over to the main venue. now questions are being raised over the quality of construction. it was not meant to be this way. this was supposed to be india's coming out party, showcasing a global showcase. >> it is under control. we are doing our best. we are confident we will be able to complete the entire renovation and cleaning. >> but not everyone is convinced. some say unless india acts quickly, the event could be in jeopardy. bbc news, delhi. >> next tuesday, there will be a conference. that is not moving news in itself, but this one is north korea, and it is extremely rare. the last time it happened 30 years ago, it led to kim jong-il succeeding his father. there is insulation he is about to hand over to one of his sons. -- there is speculation he is about to hand over to one of his sons. >> this is an early confirmed photo of the sun, taken almost two decades ago. almost nothing is known about him except that he comes from a ruthless bloodline. the eternal president and his son kim jon
did you do the deal? >> first of all, airtran brings us a number of things. they have a safe low cost high quality operation. they have a strong low fare brand. but most importantly, it provides us an opportunity to expand our route network. they fly places that we don't. we have very little overlapping routes. but notably, their largest operation is in atlanta. and we have no service to atlanta at all, as one example. it brings us more access to new york's laguardia airport, as well as first-time access for us to reagan national airport in washington d.c.. >> susie: where kelly, why did you do it now? >> i feel like we're ready now. first of all, things are so much better today than they were a year ago. our profit outlook is solid. we have plenty of cash on hand. we have a very strong balance sheet, with credit rating agencies affirming our credit rating today. so financially we're very well prepared for this. we also have a very strong leadership team. who is ready to add this major task to our list. and then we have the tools in place today that we just haven't had in the past to
street today, and in the offices of many u.s. banks. not only are the new capital standards looser than expected, but there's nearly a ten-year phase-in-- considered an eternity in the marketplace. experts say the so-called basel 3 requirements eliminate some uncertainty for financial stock investors, who were worried the rules would be tougher. k.b.w.'s fred cannon says, more importantly, they should help banks do business more cautiously. >> it means that there is risk retention for the banks. if they make a loan or do a mortgage securitization or subprime loan, they are going to have to take some risk and hold it on their balance sheet. and, that's a good thing because that's clearly one of the issues that got us into trouble a couple of years ago. >> reporter: some experts also believe the new capital standards will result in the return of juicy dividends, something that's been missing since the financial crisis unfolded. >> the banks have been precluded from paying dividends because they didn't know what capital needed to be, and they had to keep it all. now we see a number of bank
at the white house just over three weeks ago. a state department official said today the u.s. was disappointed that israel allowed the building moratorium to expire. u.s. official middle east envoy george mitchell heads back to the region tomorrow with stops in israel and ramallah. both sides have accepted an invitation to resume talks in paris next month. >> ifill: for more on what's holding these talks together so far, we turn to ghaith al-omari, the advocacy director for the american task force on palestine, and a former advisor to president abbas. and david makovsky, senior fellow at the washington institute for near east policy and the co-author of "myths, illusions, and peace." for let's talk about myths, illusions and peace, gait al on ari. what happened today. why didn't the palestinians walk away from the table as they promised they would if the settlements were not frozen. >> because they realized that the price of walking out from the talks is very high s very high from a domestic strategic perspective. ultimately they have no choice. and if you want to get a palestinian state the o
but it really was an opportunity for us to try something new and better for our patients. >> lehrer: gwen ifill has a conversation with online editor and liberal commentator arianna huffington on her new book about the declining middle class. >> warner: and jeffrey brown talks with composer and musician herbie hancock, whose 70th birthday tour fuses jazz with global beats. >> taking what happens and trying to make it work. that's something i add life >> lehrer: that's all ahead on tonight's "newshour." major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: >> this is the engine that connects abundant grain from the american heartland to haran's best selling whole wheat, while keeping 60 billion pounds of carbon out of the atmosphere every year. bnsf, the engine that connects us. >> and by the bill and melinda gates foundation. dedicated to the idea that all people deserve the chance to live a healthy productive life. and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and... this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your
. >> the policies that the republicans have offer -- are offering right now are the exact policies that got us into this mess. >> i think it just shows how out of touch the white house is. the american people are asking the question, where are the jobs? >> over the coming midterm election. >> what i'm going to remind the american people of is the policies that we have put in place have moved us in the right direction. >> no apologies for opposing the stimulus, no apologies for opposing the health care. no apologies for opposing what they call the wall street bill. gwen: and a sensational and distracting threat from an obscure florida pastor. >> we are simply burning a book. >> it doesn't in any way represent america or americans or american government or american religious or political leadership. >> we have to make sure that we don't start turning on each other. gwen: we'll put the roller coaster week in context with jackie calmes of "the new york times," david wessel of "the wall street journal" and michael duffy of "time" magazine. >> award-winning reporting and analysis. covering history a
captioning sponsored by macneil/lehrer productions >> brown: good evening. i'm jeffrey brown. the u.s. treasury and insurance giant a.i.g. unveiled a plan today to speed up the repayment of more than $100 billion in federal bailout money. >> suarez: and i'm ray suarez. on the "newshour" tonight, economic writers louise story of the "new york times" and roben farzad of "bloomberg business week" weigh the pluses and minuses of the deal. >> brown: then, kwame holman looks at the down-to-the-wire scramble as congress pushed to adjourn just weeks ahead of the midterm elections. >> suarez: judy woodruff talks to speaker of the house nancy pelosi about the battle over tax cuts and the stakes for democrats in november. >> our members left congress last night. they are confident that they would return in the majority. >> brown: special correspondent miles o'brien reports on a mississippi community's plan to use stimulus money for mass transit in rural areas. >> suarez: betty ann bowser updates the johnson and johnson story as company executives and the f.d.a. come under fire on capitol hill fo
's collapse and the ensuing crisis led to a new push to make banks safer. in the u.s. a sweeping financial reform bill signed into law in july imposed stricter capital requirements on banks, yet largely left u.s. regulators to determine those levels. now new international standards may be on the way. this weekend in basil, switzerland, central bankers from 27 countries including ben bernanke agreed to new rules that included substantially raising amount of capital that banks must hold in reserve. banks in the u.s. currently must hold about 2% of their assets in capital or equity to absorb losses in the event of runs or financial panics. under the so-called basil-3 agreement the new international standard would be 7% of assets. but banks would have until 2019 to implement it. the head of the european central bank said the move would help protect against another meltdown. >> what we have decided is commensurate to permit when we have all the standards in place to make the banking sector at a global level much more resilient. and i would say we think we are commensurate to the shocks that we
our behavior. when faced with a tough decision we rely on our emotions somewhat to help guide us. last month, we talked about positive emotions such as reward and pleasure. tonight we turn to fear and anxiety. human have evolved to feel fear in response to danger and to exhibit aggression when threatened. today fear and aggression can be found throughout the animal kingdom. by studying these emotions in animals, we may one day learn how to control violent behavior in ourselves. last month we discussed how the brap's pleasure circuits are corrupted by addiction. this evening we will learn how the brain's fear circuits go awry in clinical syndromes of fear such as chronic anxiety and post-traumatic stress disorder. human anxiety disorders are some of the most common mental illnesss in the country. nearly one-third of all americans will exhibit symptoms of an anxiety disorder at least once during his or her lifetime. post-traumatic stress disorder's also becoming more prevalent. more than 40,000 war veterans are currently affected by this illness with thousands more cases going unreported
, the engine that connects us. and the william and flora hewlett foundation, working to solve social and environmental problems at home and around the world. and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and... this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. >> lehrer: the president accused the republicans of being fiscally irresponsible, but admitted that his own policies have not worked as quickly as hoped. congressional correspondent kwame holman reports. >> we got some business to do today. >> reporter: just eight weeks from election day, the president made his pitch in cleveland today to help the sputtering u.s. economy >> that means making long-term investments in education and clean energy; in basic research, technology, and infrastructure. >> reporter: and he also took a stand against extending the bush era tax cuts for the top 2% of earners, setting up a pre- election fight with republicans in congress. he accused the g.o.p. of being mr. obama repeatedl
economy. his speech in cleveland, ohio highlighted his administration's plans for tax cuts. the u.s. secretary of state has said mexico's struck cartels increasingly look like an -- mexico's drug cartels increasingly look like an insurgency. the army was deployed against the cartels in 2006. the father of britain's prime minister has died. david cameron is the difference on the news that his father had suffered a stroke on holiday. he reached the hospital just before his father died. a russian passenger plane carrying 81 has crash landed, but all on board are uninjured. the jet was on its way to moscow when the power supply, fuel pump, and radio and navigation all failed. the jet came to rest safely in a nearby forest. hundreds of prisoners have escaped from a local jail in central nigeria as a gang of armed men attacked it. authorities are blaming a radical islamist sect. we have this report. >> police are hunting between 700 men and 800 men on the run. the gunmen who attacked the jail went from cell to cell, using bolt cutters, then setting fire to the building. intelligence indic
. he now has a best-selling autobiography, "open." his thoughts on the u.s. open and other topics in our conversation, coming up right now. >> all i know is his name is james, and he needs extra help with his reading. >> i'm james. >> yes. >> to everyone making a difference, you help us all live better. >> nationwide insurance supports tavis smiley. with every question and answer, nationwide insurance is happy to help tavis improve financial literacy and remove obstacles to economic empowerment one conversation at a time. nationwide is on your side. >> and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. [captioning made possible by kcet public television] tavis: always pleased to have andre agassi on the program. he became the only man in history to win all four grand slam titles and an olympic gold medal. his best-selling autobiography is out now, "open." to not take long for this to get on the list as well. >> i guess not. it has been quite a year. tavis: would be mean about that? >> the feedback. this came with risks, but my hope was that those who chose
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